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Herc July 17, 2014 at 12:16 AM
Prison life should be hard and difficult. We are to easy on all these felons.
koko July 19, 2014 at 11:17 AM
I don't know what is worst, that he is a police officer son that is a murder or that his mother has Read Morenothing to do with him.
Raggedyann July 19, 2014 at 11:21 AM
Looks like another Joliet central student, Ex joilet.
Shantel July 17, 2014 at 10:10 PM
I wonder what was the legal reason he was sentenced to jail time. This is why I don't engage inRead Morestat istics. Sure there may be more black men in jail but it's not because they commit more crimes. It's more because they are convicted more. It's a disgrace!
Tony July 17, 2014 at 10:32 PM
Put down the weed pipe Amin.
Clutche July 21, 2014 at 08:24 PM
douche
seer. July 13, 2014 at 10:08 PM
prisons in the US are job creators/retainers and cash cows for many private prison companies thatRead Morema ke large contributions to many judges' election campaigns (if helps if you remember that ALL judges were formerly scumbag lawyers)
Amin Falaq July 13, 2014 at 11:00 PM
About a year ago two judges were convicted of (literally) selling youth to the prion system. TheyRead Morer eceived a kickback for every juvenile sent to prison ____________________________________________________ http://www.forbes.com/sites/walterpavlo/2011/08/12/pennsylvania-judge-gets-life-sentence-for-prison-kickback-scheme/
Tony July 13, 2014 at 01:06 PM
It also acknowledges it's not a perfect system. I'll add that it's the best one in the world which Read MoreI'm sure you'll disagree.
Raggedyann July 13, 2014 at 01:12 PM
It is also known, that most of the wrongly convicted are not law abiding citizens, they have aRead Morehisto ry of criminal activity, just happened that they weren't guilty of that paticular crime.
Amin Falaq July 13, 2014 at 01:48 PM
Tell us Tony, how many other legal systems do you know about o he more than 200 throughout theRead Moreworl d, to the point that you have made the comparison to say that this one is the best in the world. ____________________________________________________ The focus is on the fact that, for each person wrongly convicted, there is at least one REAL criminal who go free. And there is the question: Ever wonder how many more crimes the REAL criminal might commit?
Jen C July 14, 2014 at 03:39 AM
LOL Wayne! My dad actually witnessed it, was flagged down by a bystander, but left when the copsRead Moreca me. I just haven't been able to find anything about it.
Bob July 14, 2014 at 06:52 AM
he was probably leaving Hamel woods
Herc July 15, 2014 at 09:16 PM
And you wont Jen, same as no one heard about the shooting at the Carpenters Union Hall about a year Read Moreago.
Amin Falaq July 13, 2014 at 07:27 PM
When I was a child, right here in Joliet, I remember the people that lived behind us across theRead Morealle y had chickens in their yard. I don't remember if they got eggs from them, but I do remember them ringing their necks, cleaning them and (well I never saw them cook and eat them--just assumed that hey did). ___________________________________________ Anyway, you don't have to wait until next year to start your garden. Depending on what you plant some of it will grow before the frost. Or you can have an indoor garden. ___________________________________________ I never had an indoor garden (may do it this year) I just would get some of my plants started inside then after the fear of the last frost is over put them outside. ___________________________________________ I encourage everyone to start gardening because soon food is going to be scarce (even for the rich) and what food their is will be extremely expensive and nothing but chemicals.
Shantel July 15, 2014 at 10:07 PM
Amin I am starting my own garden. I grew up with a garden and less doctor visits. We enjoyedRead Moreplanti ng our gardens and growing them. It was the best eating for sure. We need less fried food and more vegetables and fruit.
Amin Falaq July 16, 2014 at 06:19 AM
That is wonderful Shantel, one of the most liberating acts we can engage in is rowing our own food. Read More Just even think of how financially beneficial it is. Once you get a crop, then you automatically have seeds for the next crop, and then, as you said, you can start cutting out the medical bills. ____________________________________________________ I don't know how extensive your knowledge of Joliet is, but Humphrey Logan was my grandfather. He owned Logan's dump out on Patterson road (I don't know how many vast acres of land hat was) but there was a road that lead from Patterson road down through the dump. Then at the end of that road was this great big pretty white house surround by an awesome and heavenly garden. My father also was a gardener. He had gardens all over Joliet. ____________________________________________________ Back then garden eating was good--so it is extremely excellent in these modern days.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 02:24 PM
Comparison as the basis of a position or argument is illogical as there are no two things alike. Read MoreTh e underlying position in all if your posts are based on illogical comparisons and distortion of truth contrived to arrive at an irrational conclusion fulfilling your devious agenda. Impossible to reason with the insane as your scattered thoughts bounce around as you are cornered into reason. I went against better judgement and responded to your "malarkey" this morning. It's been fun and adios Amin. Put down the pipe!
Amin Falaq July 13, 2014 at 02:56 PM
You claimed America to have the BEST legal system in the world. Hey you brought in the term BEST. Read More ____________________________________________________ I may not type each word perfectly, but I do know and understand English grammar excellently. To say something is the BEST (that is a comparative form) you have to compare it to something.....the only thing "illogical" is to say that something is the BEST and not have anything to compare it to.
Amin Falaq July 13, 2014 at 03:18 PM
You claimed America to have the BEST legal system in the world. Hey you brought in the term BEST.Read More__ __________________________________________________ I may not type each word perfectly, but I do know and understand English grammar excellently. To say something is the BEST (that is a superlative form) you have to compare it to something.....the only thing "illogical" is to say that something is the BEST and not have anything to compare it to.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 05:37 AM
Exonerees can be found in all parts of the country, but most were concentrated in Illinois, NewRead MoreYork , Texas, and California. 93 percent are men, 7 percent women; Nearly 50 percent are black, 38 percent white, 11 percent Hispanic and 2 percent Native American or Asian; 48 percent had been falsely convicted of homicides, 35 percent of sexual assaults (23 percent adult, 12 percent child), five percent robberies, five percent other violent crimes, and seven percent drug, white-collar and other non-violent crimes. As a group, they spent more than 10,000 years in prison, an average of more than 11 years each.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 05:56 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Amin Falaq July 13, 2014 at 12:40 PM
You are correct, lala. That was the case.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 06:16 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 06:15 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 05:58 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 06:14 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Shantel July 12, 2014 at 11:35 AM
This is so wrong! I can't think of a dollar amount that can make up for an innocent person going to Read Morejail. It's outrageous! Thanks for bringing this to our attention.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 05:58 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Amin Falaq July 12, 2014 at 12:21 PM
That is the point Bob. Though I would say the shame is not that all of us cannot afford highRead Morepric ed attorney's; I would say that shame is the fact that any of us ever have to. ____________________________________________________ When you look at the hundreds who have been found innocent after convictions and sometimes as much as 20 30 years in prison, it was because of legal teams that took on their case. ____________________________________________________ The criminal system should not be such a thing that I have to have hundreds of thousands of thousands of dollars to prove myself innocent of a crime.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 05:58 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Tony July 13, 2014 at 06:14 AM
It’s certainly tragic when an innocent person goes to prison, much worse when facing theRead Moredeath penalty. And perhaps there’s something to be done to improve the odds of the innocent. Movies like “Shawshank” are great tragedies, but to understand interpret all movies as having a social subtext is simply asinine and tendentious. One should watch such movies for the art of them, much like Greek tragedies were watched and for their cathartic value. Let’s not overstate the problem either. Indeed, we’ve grown rather perverse in the previous century when it comes to how we treat the victim and the perpetrator. The truth is that by far most people in prison are there because they’re guilty and most people on death row by far are there because they committed a heinous crime. And yet we seem to focus so much of our energy on the “rights of the criminals” and not the rights of the victims. We exchange compassion for the victim for false compassion for the criminal. This is a sick state of affairs. That we obsess over prison conditions is to me repulsive, a denial of the severity of the crime, a spitting in the face of the victim and their family. I know people working in today’s modern prisons. It is laughable to claim that the conditions in these prisons are bad. They are not. If they are overcrowded, it is because we fill them with 20 year olds found in possession of a little weed for personal use or black kids caught stealing a Snickers at a 7-11 instead of the real criminals, the drug dealers, sex offenders, murderers (life in prison can mean years nowadays; we have no concept of justice anymore), and high rolling embezzlers in government and corporation. Prisoners are too comfortable and have too much say in prisons. They are afforded luxuries they should not be receiving and routinely manipulate the softness of the system to their advantage. Prison is a place to pay, it should be uncomfortable, it should be hard and difficult. Indeed, prisoners should be put to hard labor to pay for their time in prison because the amount of money we’re spending on prisoners per annum is sickening, especially when there are so many good people who could benefit from that money. Sure, a wrongful conviction is a tragedy and we should do all that we reasonably can to prevent them and make use of capital punishment as carefully and as justly as possible, but we have bigger problems and pathologies to face than something which is to a large degree an anomaly or merely the unfortunate reality of justice systems i.e. that they are never perfect and never will be.
Clutche July 10, 2014 at 08:11 PM
I will answer your question then answer mine. I looked at it from a racial point of view becauseRead MoreBla cks comprise a minority of our population but commit the majority of felonies per capita. Now, have you ever committed a crime? Statistically you probably have.
Amin Falaq July 12, 2014 at 05:41 AM
And statistically you are a racist who has in its family line at least one experience of mob action Read Moreagainst black people which involved at least one lynching. That is "statistically". ____________________________________________________ And, "statistically" you have that same mentality but are too cowardly to put on that pointed dunce hat even though at heart you admire what it stands for: that is "statistically" ____________________________________________________ And "statistically" Caucasians have always committed more crimes in America than any other group; but, "statistically" Caucasians have not been imprisoned in proportion to their crime while other ethnic groups: that is "statistically". ____________________________________________________One (absolutely just one of many) "statical" number: Two white men murdered Emmitt Till, everyone in the county knew they were guilty. An all white jury found them not guilt. Then they came out on the court house steps and bragged about how they did kill him, even sold their story to Life magazine. Then 9 black youths were sentenced to die for the rape of two white girls, when every body in the county knew that they did not do--but an all white jury found them guilty.
Clutche July 12, 2014 at 10:47 AM
blah blah blah OJ Simpson
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